Buy ‘Friends’ Star Matthew Perry’s Ultimate LA Bachelor Pad

The Hollywood Hills mid-century modern stunner can be yours for $13.5 million.

Could the views from this mid-century modern BE any more awesome? Chandler Bing would surely be jealous —  and while there’s no Central Perk nearby, the Sunset Strip location is unbeatable for staying in the heart of the action.

The sprawling 10,628-square-foot main house feels even bigger than its stated square footage thanks to an open floor plan and glass walls.

Jaw-dropping views of Los Angeles can be found from every angle of the hilltop perched 3-bed, 5-bath home. While the home doesn’t boast enough rooms for a large family, it does offer a screening room designed for a luxe movie-watching experience — complete with a view into the swimming pool.

Whether used for hosting a summer pool party or Thanksgiving dinner with all your friends, the house is designed for flawless indoor and outdoor entertaining. Retractable glass walls in the living room open directly onto a backyard patio so guests can flow in and out without hassle.

Photos by Michael McNamara/Shooting LA

On either side of the patio walkway, dramatic self-enclosed fire pits float in mini pools filled with stones and water. Beyond that, three separate seating areas beckon — one directly in front of the infinity pool and two under a covered canopy. And in case you want to take a nap in the master suite after a dip in the pool, you can swim all the way up to the retractable bedroom walls.

This home will set you back $13.5-million, but it’s an entertainer’s dream.

Greg Holcomb and Cassandra Petersen of Partners Trust hold the listing.

Related:

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ZillowBlog/~3/ZhvZdrLtxus/

Are Shipping Containers the Future of Swimming Pools?

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

One Canadian couple is making a splash transforming shipping containers into backyard swimming pools. (We always knew those shipping containers were universal!)

Paul and Denise Rathnam launched Modpools earlier this year and the idea has taken off, with orders mostly coming from the hottest locales in North America, particularly California, Nevada, Texas and Florida.

<!--/* * The backup image section of this tag has been generated for use on a * non-SSL page. If this tag is to be placed on an SSL page, change the * 'http://openx.rismedia.com/www/delivery/...' * to * 'https://openx.rismedia.com/www/delivery/...' * * This noscript section of this tag only shows image banners. There * is no width or height in these banners, so if you want these tags to * allocate space for the ad before it shows, you will need to add this * information to the tag. * * If you do not want to deal with the intricities of the noscript * section, delete the tag (from ... to ). On * average, the noscript tag is called from less than 1% of internet * users. */-->

“The traditional pool is a symbol of excess and waste. This is a little more modern, more modest. We’re repurposing something rather than recycling. This pool can be resold, and you can take it with you if you move,” Paul Rathnam told Vancouver Sun.

It’s an interesting concept, for sure, and the design, once installed, looks pretty slick. It’s as if your backyard was always destined to house a shipping container.

The standard size Modpool is eight feet wide by 20 feet long, and just over five feet deep. It also comes with a clear, acrylic window on one side, which is actually a pretty spiffy design element. Customers can opt to add another acrylic window on the other side for a see-through look if they want one.

In Canada, after delivery, a Modpool will cost you $35,000 plus tax, which could be a cheaper alternative for families planning on installing an in-ground swimming hole.

Would you buy a Modpool for your home? Tell us what you think!

Nick Caruso is RISMedia’s senior editor. Email him your real estate news ideas at nick@rismedia.com.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RismediaConsumerNewsAndAdvice/~3/XHC5G1Xy2qA/

Good Clean Fun: How to Build an Outdoor Shower

Do your deep thinking outside this summer with an outdoor shower — they're easier to set up than you might think.

Outdoor showers may seem like a luxury — something that only those with beach houses would need or be lucky enough to have. But if you have kids and pets that love to play in the yard, or if you’re an avid gardener, runner, or someone that enjoys the freedom of bathing in nature, you may consider an outdoor shower for your own home.

Lucky for you, outdoor showers are an accessible feature for just about anyone. It all depends on how simple or complex you want your shower to be. A simple outdoor shower with cold water costs approximately $1,000 or less. An outdoor shower with an enclosure and hot and cold water will run about $4,000-$8,000.

Here are four things to consider before taking the plunge on your own little piece of outdoor bathing heaven.

Location

This is one of the most important considerations. It’s best to choose a spot that you use often. In most cases, anywhere near the back entrance to your home is a good choice — maybe adjacent to the back door or on the back deck. If you have a pool, situate the shower nearby for easy rinse-offs before and after swimming.

Another major consideration is plumbing access. Unless you’re installing the type of shower that attaches to a garden hose, you’ll need to install it close to existing plumbing.

Last but not least, go for a sunny spot. This will help keep mold and mildew at bay, and provide natural warmth while you rinse.

Photo from Zillow listing

Privacy

Privacy is a fairly important consideration, unless you think only swimsuit-clad people will use the outdoor shower. “I encourage people to build with the most modest person in mind,” says Ethan Fierro, author of “The Outdoor Shower.” The trick is, you want the shower to feel private and far from prying eyes, but you also want to keep the natural feeling.

Photo courtesy of Point One Architects.

An easy and adjustable choice is a freestanding folding screen. These screens work particularly well on decks and patios, where it might be impractical to build any type of wall.

Another option is building corrugated metal wing walls to create a shower “corner” of sorts, where swimmers can rinse off after a dip. You can make this more private by adding a third wall to the design. Of course, there’s always the more elaborate option, which would be to surround the shower with wooden walls.

Plumbing

The simplest and most inexpensive plumbing option, and one that many people choose, is a shower connected to a garden hose, which is then hooked up to an outside faucet. This cold-water fixture is perfect for an outdoor shower that’s used only in the heat of summer, and mostly for cleaning off dirt and sand.

Next up is the hot-and-cold hose option. First, you’ll need a plumber to install an outdoor hot-water faucet next to the cold one. From there, it basically works in a similar fashion to the cold-water hose shower.

Photo from Zillow listing

The most elaborate — and most expensive — is the plumbed-in outdoor shower. This is worth investing in if you anticipate consistent outdoor showers, and not just for cleaning up after a hot day in the sun. The only downside to this option: If you live in an area with freezing winters, you have to make sure you can fully drain and insulate the plumbing so it doesn’t burst.

Drainage

The simplest and most common drainage system is letting the used water drain into your yard. If you don’t have very porous ground in your yard, or if the outdoor shower is close to your home, consider attaching the plumbing to your home’s drainage pipes or installing a French drain (essentially, a gravel-lined channel connected to a pipe that directs water to a drainage area).

The easiest thing to do, of course, is to go with the first option and recycle the water into your garden.

Accessories

Add some affordable accessories that greatly increase the fun and pleasure of showering outdoors. A large rainfall showerhead enhances that outdoor feeling, and plants or flowers in the shower area or peeping through the enclosure add a whimsical touch.

Photo courtesy of Urrutia Design.

Add some soft solar-powered lights for showering at dusk, install hooks for hanging towels and wet bathing suits, and maybe even add a chair to sit in. Most importantly, design your shower to take advantage of nature’s views, whether that’s the sky overhead or the splendor of your backyard garden.

Photo from Zillow listing

With just a little planning and effort, you can install your own outdoor shower and stay cool during the sweltering summer months.

Get more outdoor shower design inspiration on Zillow Digs.

Top photo from Zillow listing

Related:

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ZillowBlog/~3/8YQHy53qr8Q/

Rapper Lil Wayne Sails Away From Miami Mansion for $10M

It’s Shark Week every week at this home, which has its own indoor pool for the fearsome fishes.

Lil Wayne may have had enough Miami vice.

The musician (real name: Dwayne Michael Carter, Jr.) is offloading his Miami Beach mansion to a new owner for a cool $10 million dollars. The waterfront home sits on a tiny, exclusive island just minutes away from world-famous South Beach.

Wayne’s estate features sleek, modern architecture, expansive windows, and a private boat dock. Dual balconies provide views of Biscayne Bay, while the roof boasts a custom-built skate park.

But the real mic drop may be an indoor shark pool.

Yes, that’s right. An indoor shark pool:

Photos courtesy of Spectrum Real Estate.

There’s no word on whether the 6-bedroom main house comes with sharks included, but a 3-bedroom guesthouse boasts a private recording studio.

There’s an outdoor infinity pool to cool off in during those hot South Florida summers, and 15,000 square feet of interior living space.

Photos courtesy of Spectrum Real Estate.

In related news, sharks appear to be having a pop culture moment this summer, with a “floating screening” of  “JAWS” in Texas (viewers sit in innertubes while watching the movie), while “Sharknado 5” has a planned release in August.

Ty Forkner of Sotheby’s International Realty carried the listing. 

Related:

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ZillowBlog/~3/96h5XPN2EBw/

Designer Lookbook: Board & Vellum’s Second Story Add-on

Short on space? Take a cue from this Seattle firm's clever remodel to maximize every square foot.

Bigger isn’t always better. In the case of this West Seattle remodel, the owners were set against a large, looming addition that they feared would overwhelm surrounding homes. They turned to Seattle design firm Board Vellum, where they found the solution to their need for extra space.

In a surprisingly compact 740 square feet, their new addition incorporates space-saving techniques and unique design elements without overshadowing the neighbors.

The existing single-story home featured a finished basement, a small living room, two small bedrooms on the main level, an awkward entry, and few distinguishing features. “It just didn’t live large enough,” says Jeff Pelletier, principal at Board Vellum. “There was no real breathing room at all.”

Understandably, the owners wanted more space, but they weren’t interested in sacrificing curb appeal to get it. Pelletier, who says he loves optimizing small spaces, was the perfect architect to take on the challenge.

A second story made the most sense to get the square footage the family needed, and Pelletier used a combination of bold structural choices and whimsical details to achieve the goal.

Moving up

A second-story addition naturally requires a new stairway to reach it. The typical approach of stacking the new staircase atop the basement set of stairs initially made a lot of sense, Pelletier says, but it “created a challenging second floor that didn’t really work.”

Instead, Pelletier and his team turned a former front bedroom into an entry hall, and placed the new stairway just inside the front door. Then, they added a large archway and glass cabinets between the entry hall and the adjoining living room.

A generous pass-through helps the room spill out into an adjoining space without adding any square footage, while double-sided glass cabinets increase the visual size of the room and help it feel larger. “It’s a great trick for small spaces, where you need storage and a more open feel,” Pelletier says.

Another of the home’s space-optimizing design elements is a 3-foot overhang of the second story at the rear of the house. Placing the bulk at the back of the house easily hides the added space, and also creates a welcome cover over the back deck and grill.

It’s the little things

While the bulk of the family’s new space came with the construction of the second story, a number of smaller design elements helped the family further realize their addition’s potential.

The two kids’ rooms in the new upstairs space offered the most potential for creative design. “The rooms didn’t have to be big, but they had to be interesting,” says Pelletier.

In the daughter’s room, he created a reading nook in a window seat, with built-in bookshelves and storage underneath. In the boy’s room, he opened up the attic to create a loft accessed by a wall-mounted ladder, and closet doors slide side to side instead of swinging open into the room.

Instead of adding doors to upstairs linen closets, Pelletier designed a series of drawers so the closet looks like a built-in cabinet. And in the kids’ bathroom, Pelletier held out for a bathtub that was just slightly smaller than a conventional tub (4 1/2 feet long versus 5 feet long) but fit just right in the available space.

“That extra 6 inches made all the difference,” says Pelletier. “Sometimes you have to look for solutions that are a little more custom but allow the home to feel larger.”

Make the most of your remodel

Sometimes small design changes are all it takes to let a small home breathe. Pelletier offers a few tips to homeowners looking to add space to their existing homes.

  • Turn an attic into loft space. Removing a ceiling to open up an attic can make small bedrooms feel larger. It also allows for the option of a sleeping loft — something kids especially love.
  • Maximize space with built-ins. Adding built-in nooks — such as the glass cabinet in the entryway of this West Seattle home — offers space to store linens and collectibles, while also creating a sight line between two rooms.
  • Blend two small rooms. Adding French doors between a small office and a small living area gives homeowners the option of combining the two. Swing the doors open to create a combined space, and close the doors when there’s work to be done.
  • Consider a finished basement. Remodeling an unfinished basement is a sure way to gain more space, and it’s usually less expensive than adding on vertically.

See more home design inspiration on Zillow Digs.

Photos by John G. Wilbanks Photography

Related:

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ZillowBlog/~3/ozuoOIIvG8U/